Long-lasting Benefits of Teaching Geography and Social Studies Together

March 28, 2019 By Ken Klieman
“History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage need not be lived again.”  - Maya Angelou

Support Inquiry-Based Learning in the Classroom with Digital Activities

March 19, 2019 By Michael Hutchison

There is a lot of information out there about inquiry-based learning: what it is, how effective it is, and so on.  However, a question that many have is, “how can inquiry-based learning be used with digital activities?”  Let’s look at some examples of how to combine inquiry-based and digital learning.

Make Your Social Studies Lessons Place-Based with Primary Sources

March 13, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Are you searching for ways to make your social studies lessons relate to the lives of your students? Make memorable connections between national trends in history, economics, culture, politics, and geography with these place-based primary sources.

An Introduction to Formative and Summative Assessments: Using Learning Targets and Mastery vs. Compliance

March 7, 2019 By Anthony DiSario

“These kids! They never do well on my social studies tests!”

3 Activities to Celebrate International Women's Day with Your Classroom

February 27, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

International Women’s Day is March 8, 2019, and presents an opportunity to celebrate women from throughout history. Humanities curricula and history books are often dominated by United States presidents, world explorers, and cultural elites, who are mostly male. This year, teach your students about the women activists, suffragettes, and trailblazers who paved the way for equality across the world. Here are some activities to use in the classroom.

The Key to Quality Professional Learning: Relevant and Beneficial Training

February 20, 2019 By Pam Gothart

Take a moment and reflect on professional development events you have attended, and ask yourself, how many of them were “really” good,  meaningful, effective, and relevant to your chosen profession? As educators, we attend several types of training, many of which are mandatory, or are recommended from our superiors. Occasionally, we get lucky and can select a specific training we deem valuable, but those may be few and far between.

5 Active Classroom Activities to Help Your Students Build Critical Thinking Skills

February 14, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

Thinking is hard. At least, that is what our students tend to believe. They sigh when we ask them to complete a research assignment, or to write an analytical essay. Even the most basic questions asked of them, can be responded with a grunt.

Ways to Impact Your Students and Leave a Legacy: The Phil Fowler Story

February 6, 2019 By Dennis Fowler

Do you remember your favorite teacher?

Who could ever forget that teacher?  Who could ever forget the special way that teacher inspired you and made you a better student and person at the same time?

Do Latino Students Read Differently Than Other Americans? - How History and Religion Affect Reading Habits and Practices

There can be no doubt that the level of teaching and learning in your classroom would vastly improve if every single student possessed a high literacy level and a consistent reading habit, both at home and school.  However, many do not, and perhaps you’ve wondered why.  In a search for some answers, I would like to pose a few sensitive questions.

Teaching Daily Life in the Past: Using Essential Questions in Chronological Units

January 23, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

The history of ordinary people and everyday life appeals to students. However, teachers struggle to squeeze it into a social studies curriculum dominated by stories of wealthy elites and political chronology.