Cynthia Resor

Why Teaching Social Studies Matters for Our Future

October 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies teachers hold the key to our future.

Compare and Contrast Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Media Through “Cut and Paste”

September 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Before the computer revolution, cut and paste required scissors and glue. This method originally required scissors to clip information from a newspaper or magazine and glue so the clipping could be attached to paper and saved, shared, or reprinted. In the twenty-first century, the phrase cut and paste has evolved to describe digital methods of replicating information. As students depend more and more on digital information in the classroom, what are the implications of modern cutting and pasting?

Social Reform Throughout History: Lessons for Social Studies Students

September 9, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In our modern world, different groups are seeking to make changes in their society. Protests, violent and nonviolent, come in many forms. The story of England’s seventeenth-century Diggers is a contrast to many historical uprisings because it was peaceful and its participants hoped to reform the economy of their nation and create an agrarian utopia.

Collective Memory: How Do Memories of the Past Inform Our Future?

August 26, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Collective memory, or social memory, is how a group of people remember and forget the past. Individuals and societies base self-understanding and decision-making on past experiences. However, how accurately do we really remember? What do we choose to forget? What is the impact of false or incorrect memories?

3 Easy Ways to Make Social Studies Memorable

August 10, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies classrooms can often become a regurgitation of facts, events, and people throughout history. But learning about history and social studies themes has never been more important for students. 

What Social Studies Students Can Learn from Historical Uprisings

July 8, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In the summer of 1381, working people in England were enraged, and for two months they made their voices heard by forming armed groups, marching on several towns and London, destroying the property of hated government officials, and burning tax records.

Urban Legends Aren’t a New Thing: Teaching Media Literacy with Historical Examples

June 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Urban legends, referred to by folklorists as contemporary legends, are fictional stories claimed to be true. Myths and legends from throughout history often contain an underlying warning about a potential danger to avoid.

Why the History of Words Matters in Social Studies

May 24, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Etymology, the study of the origin of words and how the meanings of words change over time, is just as relevant in social studies as it is in English classes. When words appear in a language, how words evolve and change, and when words are discarded tell a wider social, political, economic, or cultural story. For students learning social studies, the benefits of learning these words can be immense, and serve to build essential skills. 

A History of Quack Cures: Critical Analysis in the Classroom

May 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Quacks love health crises, and the COVID-19 virus has become very lucrative for people who make claims about unscientific cures. In recent months, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warnings to several companies who are promoting fraudulent products. These companies deceptively claim their products can treat or cure the virus. Modern teas, oils, and other treatments are not scientifically proven to be effective, yet customers are desperate enough to fall for these “curative” products. This isn't to say holistic and alternative medicines do not have healing properties for some, but overall the efficacy of these products and practices is largely unproven by evidence-based research. 

Trade Wars Aren’t a New Thing: Examining Economics with Historical Examples

April 21, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

The United States has been involved in trade wars with nations around the world in recent years. Instead of weapons, these “wars” are waged with tariffs, taxes on imported or exported goods.