David L. Moguel, Ph.D., CSU Northridge

Connect European Imperialism to Your Students' Lives via the Quinceanera and Cinco de Mayo

Author's mother, Addy Yolanda López de Moguel, quinceañera, 1961, Mérida, Yucatán, México.

It is time for the Cinco de Mayo celebrations again. This minor Mexican holiday has been relegated to being  a regional American beer holiday, but it can also provide some teaching opportunities for your classroom.

Activities to Get Students to Do the Reading in Social Studies

Students not doing the reading assigned for homework seems to be an eternal challenge for every teacher.  Failure to do the reading stunts classroom discussions, prevents students from learning and understanding the material to an adequate depth, and does nothing to help students build literacy skills.

Help Students Explore How Puritanism Shaped the U.S. Government

I have wondered, especially this past year, why many Americans dislike their government because they think it intrudes on their freedom, and why many Mexicans and Latin Americans mistrust their governments because they think they are corrupt and abuse their power. How did both societies come to have those specific relationships between the individual and government?

Give Students A Fresh Perspective on Government: How Catholicism Shaped Latin American Regimes

This article covers the influence of Catholicism in shaping the form and philosophy of government in Latin America, affecting how Latino students and their families think and feel about government. Tapping into that prior knowledge and experience, and prompting students to seek these connections between history, government, and their personal lives and cultural backgrounds is a unique and powerful way to engage and sustain the interest of young students.

How Hispanic and Latino Students Can See More of Themselves in the Current Social Studies Curriculum

It’s not a stretch to say that Hispanic/Latino students have an ancestral background in the subjects we teach.

This Is How We Can Teach the True African American Experience

History/social studies teachers know they have to cover, at some point, Africa in world history courses and the African American experience in U.S. history courses.