Monet Hendricks

How Congressional COVID Funding Could Impact Your District

April 19, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

Billions of dollars in federal COVID-19 recovery funds are flowing to American schools.

25 Trailblazers to Celebrate This Women's History Month

March 15, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

March marks Women’s History Month, which is a whole month to celebrate the specific achievements made by women throughout history.

The History behind Presidential Transitions in the United States

January 14, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

American democracy began as an experiment. Historically, nations around the world were empires founded on a hierarchy of monarchs or dictatorship. The founding fathers implemented the US Constitution to ensure that the new nation would be different and represent the interests of all individuals rather than aristocrats—hence the creation of our democratic two-party system of government and the electoral college voting system that elects the presiding members of the executive branch.

4 Considerations to Make This Native American Heritage Month

November 23, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

November is Native American Heritage Month, or, as it is commonly referred to, American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.

A Brief History of the Right to Vote

October 26, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Determining whether voting is a right or a privilege has been a battleground for states to control who can cast a ballot in elections. Technically, states regulate eligible voters, but, through the course of history, the US federal government has made several key decisions that have altered those requirements in an attempt to create more equality in the voting process.

Early Childhood Education: An Investment in Development

October 15, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

For the majority of children in the United States, formal and required schooling begins in kindergarten, at approximately age five or six. Yet research tells us that the years prior to children entering school are a cornerstone phase of development for all human beings.

What RBG Means to Me: A Personal Reflection

September 24, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

In early 2019, I walked into an exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles that exponentially expanded my love and respect for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I had long admired her soft but fierce demeanor on the Supreme Court bench and was excited to learn more about the life of this extraordinary woman and pop culture icon. I left that museum more awestruck than I could have ever imagined.

Adjusting to a New Normal: 5 Tips for Back-to-School This Year

September 3, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Whether the school year is in person, fully remote, or a hybrid of the two, teachers, administration, and school support staff are collectively navigating uncharted territory. As we enter a brand-new normal, educators are bound to face new challenges in the classroom.

Books to Promote Diversity in the K-8 Social Studies Classroom

August 13, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Teaching all sides of history and utilizing resources that aim to showcase diverse peoples is essential in the modern social studies classroom. Recognizing the unique struggles of people of color throughout history and empathizing with them takes precedence in learning, now more than ever. 

Foster Social and Emotional Learning This Upcoming School Year

July 16, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Students in the K-12 setting experience immense developmental changes, socially, emotionally, and academically. All the while, they go through dreaded awkward stages—braces, bad haircuts, first crushes—and experience greater demands from parents, teachers, and community members.