The Power of Professional Development for Educators

October 21, 2020 By Melissa Knowles

Teaching is as much a learning experience for educators as it is for students. The challenges of the pandemic have made people more aware of the need for educators to continue to grow and evolve to meet the needs of the changing world and its changing students.

Early Childhood Education: An Investment in Development

October 15, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

For the majority of children in the United States, formal and required schooling begins in kindergarten, at approximately age five or six. Yet research tells us that the years prior to children entering school are a cornerstone phase of development for all human beings.

Why Teaching Social Studies Matters for Our Future

October 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies teachers hold the key to our future.

“Pealing” Away Boring Social Studies Lessons with Bells

October 3, 2020 By Kay Gandy

Bells end and begin our classes. In the past, teachers rang hand-held bells to start the school day. The Liberty Bell may be the icon that students know from history, but there are many ways to use bells in the teaching of social studies. Explore with your students how the sound of bells is present in our daily life and in the past.

Compare and Contrast Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Media Through “Cut and Paste”

September 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Before the computer revolution, cut and paste required scissors and glue. This method originally required scissors to clip information from a newspaper or magazine and glue so the clipping could be attached to paper and saved, shared, or reprinted. In the twenty-first century, the phrase cut and paste has evolved to describe digital methods of replicating information. As students depend more and more on digital information in the classroom, what are the implications of modern cutting and pasting?

What RBG Means to Me: A Personal Reflection

September 24, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

In early 2019, I walked into an exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles that exponentially expanded my love and respect for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I had long admired her soft but fierce demeanor on the Supreme Court bench and was excited to learn more about the life of this extraordinary woman and pop culture icon. I left that museum more awestruck than I could have ever imagined.

5 Ways to Make Distance Learning Effective for Students

September 16, 2020 By Leona Henryson

The move to remote learning has thrown students and educators into a whole new world. To help students, educators must understand potential roadblocks and challenges; then they must come up with creative solutions. To help with that, here are five ways to make distance learning effective for students.

Social Reform Throughout History: Lessons for Social Studies Students

September 9, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In our modern world, different groups are seeking to make changes in their society. Protests, violent and nonviolent, come in many forms. The story of England’s seventeenth-century Diggers is a contrast to many historical uprisings because it was peaceful and its participants hoped to reform the economy of their nation and create an agrarian utopia.

Adjusting to a New Normal: 5 Tips for Back-to-School This Year

September 3, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Whether the school year is in person, fully remote, or a hybrid of the two, teachers, administration, and school support staff are collectively navigating uncharted territory. As we enter a brand-new normal, educators are bound to face new challenges in the classroom.

Collective Memory: How Do Memories of the Past Inform Our Future?

August 26, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Collective memory, or social memory, is how a group of people remember and forget the past. Individuals and societies base self-understanding and decision-making on past experiences. However, how accurately do we really remember? What do we choose to forget? What is the impact of false or incorrect memories?