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Teaching Cajun and Creole Culture through Folktales

June 3, 2021 By Kay Gandy

There is a direct relationship between culture and folktales. The tales reflect the everyday life of a people. Creole and Cajun tales have been passed down orally for many generations, but some have been collected and published. Both Cajun and Creole people in Louisiana have stories which can be used in the classroom to develop an awareness and understanding of their respective cultures.

10+ Asian Pacific Americans to Celebrate this Heritage Month

May 23, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

May marks Asian Pacific American Heritage Month, which is a time to celebrate the specific achievements made by Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders throughout history.

Teaching Students to Become Change Agents through Social Studies Instruction

May 17, 2021 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

Social studies encompasses several dynamics that affect daily student learning. Through the variety of social studies disciplines,  students are taught how to become effectual change agents for the betterment of our society through learning complex histories, civic standards, and geographic understanding of the world around them.

Teaching about the American West: Vaqueros

May 6, 2021 By Kay Gandy

Cowboys are found in many countries around the world. In Chile, they are called huasos, in Argentina gauchos, in Australia jackeroos, and in Venezuela llaneros. The original cowboys in North America were Spanish and were called vaqueros. They were very skilled in driving and handling the long-horned cattle that they introduced to on the continent in the seventeenth century. As with the black cowboys, Mexican cowboys also faced discrimination, earning less pay and being prevented from advancing to foreman or trail boss.

Teaching about the American West: Cowgirls

May 4, 2021 By Kay Gandy

While their urban counterparts were restricted to more traditional female roles in the late 1800’s, women of the American West were roping and riding broncs. The term “cowgirl” first appeared in print by the early 1890s. Daughters of pioneer ranchers grew up riding and roping along with their brothers because on small ranches, everyone helped with the cattle. Attitudes of the day deemed it improper for a woman to dress and ride like a man, so many women wore full skirts and rode sidesaddle. During the Wild West shows, women first appeared as competitors with women like sharpshooter Annie Oakley, bronc rider Bertha Blancett, and steer-roper Mabel Strickland.

Teaching about the American West: Native Americans as Cowboys

April 29, 2021 By Kay Gandy

Dime-store novels and Wild West television shows helped construct the stereotypical images of the “white” cowboy and the red-skinned Indian “savages.” As the West was often portrayed as a battlefield between these two groups, it may be difficult for students to understand that so-called Indians were often also cowboys. However, this narrative of the Wild West is incomplete, and teachers can easily rectify this by teaching about the indigenous experience during this westward expansion period. Early Spanish missionaries actually trained Native Americans as cattle herders, leading many indigenous peoples to adopt ranching into their economies.

Teaching about the American West: Black Cowboys

April 27, 2021 By Kay Gandy

The cowboy is viewed as an American icon: rugged rider of the range; champion of the good. Yet our understanding of cowboys has, for the most part, been informed by movies and television shows. Cowboy culture and history are a product of diverse men and women of all backgrounds; therefore, it is important for teachers to expose students to the varied cultures that influenced the American West.

How Congressional COVID Funding Could Impact Your District

April 19, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

Billions of dollars in federal COVID-19 recovery funds are flowing to American schools.

Teaching History through Ceramic Tiles

April 5, 2021 By Kay Gandy

Clay has been used for many things throughout history, including writing surfaces, money, cooking vessels, and building materials. Archaeologists use ceramics as a tool for dating cultures, which can be impactful to note in the social studies classroom. Teaching the evolution of tiles, ceramics, and clay throughout various cultures can inform students about how civilizations utilized these materials and advanced throughout history.

Supporting Students with Social Emotional Initiatives during COVID-19

March 30, 2021 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

The COVID-19 pandemic has shifted how we have approached educating children.