Symbol Scavenger Hunt: Hands-on activities for interpreting political cartoons

October 11, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Interpreting political cartoons can be a real challenge for many students in the classroom. Students struggle to recognize the people, symbols, and events without context, making deducing the message of the cartoonist nearly impossible. Create a political cartoon scavenger hunt activity to help your students identify who and what is depicted. With this basic knowledge, interpreting the larger message conveyed by the cartoonist becomes easier.

Compelling Essential Questions:  Connecting the dots for our students

October 9, 2019 By Karla Wienhold

Think back to when you were a young child, trying to connect the numbered or letter dots to figure out what the mystery image would be.  You would carefully plot where the next line would go so the picture would come out just right.  Using essential questions is very much like that dot puzzle, trying to figure out what the major piece of the mystery concept is.  As teachers, our job is to help develop questioning skills in our students so they can successfully uncover the hidden picture, to help them develop the skills of inquiry to fit all the pieces of the lesson together. 

An Easy Guide for Teachers to Start Connecting With Their Students

September 30, 2019 By Dennis Fowler

How often do you step away from your social studies curriculum to get to know your students? Once a week? Once a month? Do you ever make specific plans or set aside specific time in your lessons to build meaningful, appropriate relationships with your kids?

Using Etiquette Lessons to Discuss Culture and Analyze Primary Sources

September 27, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Etiquette comprises rules to follow and manners expected of a person in social or professional situations. Today, the components of etiquette have been rebranded as “soft skills,” the behaviors that help people work well with others.

5 Ways Teachers Can Address Socioeconomic Gaps in the Classroom

September 18, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

For my first permanent teaching position, I was lucky enough to fill a history position at a small K-8 school in a rural community. I say lucky for several reasons.

The Power of Guided Play through a Narrative in the Pre-K Classroom

September 13, 2019 By Margit E. McGuire, PhD

Young children understand stories and love to have books read to them often to the point that they memorize and can recite a favorite story from memory. Narratives establish supportive conditions in the brain for learning and remembering (McTighe and Willis, 2019). As young learners brains develop, their imaginations also run wild, and they love to pretend. Combining these two elements, the role-play with the narrative, is the basis for the Storypath learning method.

Help Your Students Think about Labor Day in a New Way

September 2, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Labor Day commemorates the American worker on the first Monday in September. This upcoming Labor Day, remember to highlight the history of workers who are often overlooked or forgotten: slaves, domestic laborers, military-camp followers, and children.

Classroom Blogs: Your Easy Guide to Incorporating them into Lesson Plans

August 27, 2019 By Dennis Fowler

Do you purposely plan your lessons with your students’ “interests” in mind? If not, you should start doing so immediately.

10 Tips for New or Transitioning Teachers This School Year

August 22, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

This past school year, I transitioned from a K–8 school to a high school. I went from teaching sixth, seventh, and eighth graders to ninth and twelfth graders. In short, it was a big jump going from a middle school setting to the high school.

How to Teach Students to Identify Bias in a Primary Source

May 30, 2019 By Kevin Gregory

Early in the school year, students often ask me, “why do I need a history class?” They go on to say they know why science, math, and English are taught, but they don't know why they need to learn so many random dates and historical facts. They are skeptical about memorizing facts from the past and its relevance to their future.  I generally respond by saying something along the lines of, “you don’t need to memorize everything,” because a vast amount of information is readily available to today’s students online, but I emphasize that there's more to history and social studies than just dates and figures.