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Collective Memory: How Do Memories of the Past Inform Our Future?

August 26, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Collective memory, or social memory, is how a group of people remember and forget the past. Individuals and societies base self-understanding and decision-making on past experiences. However, how accurately do we really remember? What do we choose to forget? What is the impact of false or incorrect memories?

How Teachers Can Address Cultural Diversity in the Classroom

August 18, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

As we stand on the precipice of change. We must address several pertinent issues that relate to the Black Lives Matter movement. Change is inevitable, and if things are to be different, a level of respect must be developed between all parties. How do we address these issues? What must we do to ensure students move progressively toward making systemic change?

Books to Promote Diversity in the K-8 Social Studies Classroom

August 13, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Teaching all sides of history and utilizing resources that aim to showcase diverse peoples is essential in the modern social studies classroom. Recognizing the unique struggles of people of color throughout history and empathizing with them takes precedence in learning, now more than ever. 

3 Easy Ways to Make Social Studies Memorable

August 10, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies classrooms can often become a regurgitation of facts, events, and people throughout history. But learning about history and social studies themes has never been more important for students. 

Teaching Remotely: A Reflection for This Upcoming School Year

August 5, 2020 By Jessica Hayes

As I think about my virtual learning experience in the time of quarantine, I will say the feeling that is more dominant than most is “dislike.” I won’t say I hated it, but this was an unusual circumstance into which we were thrown.

Teaching Students About How History Can Repeat Itself

July 27, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

History is the study of past events in human affairs and part of our daily lives. There's no way around it, we are living in a historical moment currently that will affect future generations to come.

Foster Social and Emotional Learning This Upcoming School Year

July 16, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Students in the K-12 setting experience immense developmental changes, socially, emotionally, and academically. All the while, they go through dreaded awkward stages—braces, bad haircuts, first crushes—and experience greater demands from parents, teachers, and community members. 

What Social Studies Students Can Learn from Historical Uprisings

July 8, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In the summer of 1381, working people in England were enraged, and for two months they made their voices heard by forming armed groups, marching on several towns and London, destroying the property of hated government officials, and burning tax records.

The Teacher's Guide to Educational Funding in K-12 Schools

July 1, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Funding for public education can be a tricky topic to comprehend fully. As the process is complex, federal funding can bring up a myriad of questions, and new educators may not know how to make sense of it all.

Urban Legends Aren’t a New Thing: Teaching Media Literacy with Historical Examples

June 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Urban legends, referred to by folklorists as contemporary legends, are fictional stories claimed to be true. Myths and legends from throughout history often contain an underlying warning about a potential danger to avoid.