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Using Writing to Support K-12 Social Studies Instruction

January 25, 2021 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

Writing has become an integral part of the social studies curriculum. Students need to know that this activity strengthens their reading skills as well as helps them to embrace the content more fluidly. When writing about specific historical events, oftentimes students must research their topic to gain factual knowledge. This is an important aspect to documenting and understanding historical events accurately.

Micro-credentials: The Future of Professional Development?

January 21, 2021 By Dr. Aaron Willis

Are you looking for a way to promote professional development for teachers in your district at a time when face-to-face meetings are becoming increasingly complicated, if not impossible?

How to Build Teacher Leaders: A Reflection from Directors of the Houston Independent School District

January 2021 marks the fifth anniversary of the annual For-Teachers-by-Teachers Conference presented by our district, the Houston Independent School District. This conference allows the teachers who make up our secondary social studies teacher leader corps program the space and time to authentically exhibit their new learning content, instructional strategies, district instructional resources, and the skills needed to successfully create and execute professional development.

The History behind Presidential Transitions in the United States

January 14, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

American democracy began as an experiment. Historically, nations around the world were empires founded on a hierarchy of monarchs or dictatorship. The founding fathers implemented the US Constitution to ensure that the new nation would be different and represent the interests of all individuals rather than aristocrats—hence the creation of our democratic two-party system of government and the electoral college voting system that elects the presiding members of the executive branch.

Sing a Song of Social Studies: How-to Incorporate Music into Your Curriculum

December 18, 2020 By Kay Gandy

Throughout the years, teachers have used music in instruction, such as the ABC song, to teach the alphabet, and “The Hokey Pokey,” to teach body parts and directions. As one of Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligence areas, music is a great tool to use to teach social studies. The pattern and rhythm of songs encourage memory, movement, and creativity with students. Music is a part of children's daily life and therefore a connection to real-world learning.

Teaching During a Pandemic: A Personal Reflection

December 11, 2020 By Jessica Hayes

As the end of the first semester during COVID-19 approaches, I wanted to take a moment to reflect on how the experience has gone and what I can do going forward to make the school year a better experience for the students and myself.

Support Virtual Learning in Social Studies with Storyboarding

December 3, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

Keeping students at the secondary level engaged in the virtual environment is difficult. Sitting in front of a computer anywhere between four to eight hours a day can be draining and taxing on a student’s mental health and overall brain power, but you can make virtual learning fun!

Strategies to Help ELL Students Access Online Social Studies Curricula

November 27, 2020 By Susan McDonald, M.S., CCC-SLP

Teaching online is a unique experience for everyone—teachers, students, and parents alike. Some students are thriving in the online environment, and others are struggling. For our English language learners (ELLs), this new medium can provide even greater challenges to accessing the curriculum, but sound teaching practices will help them (and you) get through this successfully.

4 Considerations to Make This Native American Heritage Month

November 23, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

November is Native American Heritage Month, or, as it is commonly referred to, American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.

Foster Communication Skills During Student Research Projects

November 17, 2020 By Leona Henryson

The pillars of good research include accuracy, good data, good methodologies, and great communication skills. That last part is often overlooked. The idea that research speaks for itself is a myth. If that were true, only scientifically valid information would gain traction.