Stay up to date

Subscribe to our blog

Enhance Virtual Learning Using Depth of Knowledge

November 11, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

Teaching our students in a completely virtual environment has been a whole new world. The strategies used in the traditional in-person classroom to group students for success have gone by the wayside.

Strategies to Combat Teacher Burnout

November 5, 2020 By Susan McDonald, M.S., CCC-SLP

Burnout is a word being used quite a bit these days. It’s no wonder, with the colossal shifts in education that we all had to undertake without much notice eight months ago. Between learning the alphabet soup of available digital products and platforms, managing new models of instruction, and WFH (that’s “working from home” for those of you born before 1995), it is enough to make our heads spin. Feelings of frustration, anxiety, and being overwhelmed are understandable during this time of transition.

The Importance of Establishing Democracy in Elementary Classrooms

October 28, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

America was built on democracy, a set of rules that governs the people in a state or country. Most elementary classrooms can follow this same doctrine by establishing rules and polices that guide and govern activities in that classroom.

A Brief History of the Right to Vote

October 26, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Determining whether voting is a right or a privilege has been a battleground for states to control who can cast a ballot in elections. Technically, states regulate eligible voters, but, through the course of history, the US federal government has made several key decisions that have altered those requirements in an attempt to create more equality in the voting process.

The Power of Professional Development for Educators

October 21, 2020 By Melissa Knowles

Teaching is as much a learning experience for educators as it is for students. The challenges of the pandemic have made people more aware of the need for educators to continue to grow and evolve to meet the needs of the changing world and its changing students.

Early Childhood Education: An Investment in Development

October 15, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

For the majority of children in the United States, formal and required schooling begins in kindergarten, at approximately age five or six. Yet research tells us that the years prior to children entering school are a cornerstone phase of development for all human beings.

Why Teaching Social Studies Matters for Our Future

October 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies teachers hold the key to our future.

“Pealing” Away Boring Social Studies Lessons with Bells

October 3, 2020 By Kay Gandy

Bells end and begin our classes. In the past, teachers rang hand-held bells to start the school day. The Liberty Bell may be the icon that students know from history, but there are many ways to use bells in the teaching of social studies. Explore with your students how the sound of bells is present in our daily life and in the past.

Compare and Contrast Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Media Through “Cut and Paste”

September 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Before the computer revolution, cut and paste required scissors and glue. This method originally required scissors to clip information from a newspaper or magazine and glue so the clipping could be attached to paper and saved, shared, or reprinted. In the twenty-first century, the phrase cut and paste has evolved to describe digital methods of replicating information. As students depend more and more on digital information in the classroom, what are the implications of modern cutting and pasting?

What RBG Means to Me: A Personal Reflection

September 24, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

In early 2019, I walked into an exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles that exponentially expanded my love and respect for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I had long admired her soft but fierce demeanor on the Supreme Court bench and was excited to learn more about the life of this extraordinary woman and pop culture icon. I left that museum more awestruck than I could have ever imagined.