5 Ways Teachers Can Address Socioeconomic Gaps in the Classroom

September 18, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

For my first permanent teaching position, I was lucky enough to fill a history position at a small K-8 school in a rural community. I say lucky for several reasons.

The Power of Guided Play through a Narrative in the Pre-K Classroom

September 13, 2019 By Margit E. McGuire, PhD

Young children understand stories and love to have books read to them often to the point that they memorize and can recite a favorite story from memory. Narratives establish supportive conditions in the brain for learning and remembering (McTighe and Willis, 2019). As young learners brains develop, their imaginations also run wild, and they love to pretend. Combining these two elements, the role-play with the narrative, is the basis for the Storypath learning method.

Help Your Students Think about Labor Day in a New Way

September 2, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Labor Day commemorates the American worker on the first Monday in September. This upcoming Labor Day, remember to highlight the history of workers who are often overlooked or forgotten: slaves, domestic laborers, military-camp followers, and children.

Classroom Blogs: Your Easy Guide to Incorporating them into Lesson Plans

August 27, 2019 By Dennis Fowler

Do you purposely plan your lessons with your students’ “interests” in mind? If not, you should start doing so immediately.

10 Tips for New or Transitioning Teachers This School Year

August 22, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

This past school year, I transitioned from a K–8 school to a high school. I went from teaching sixth, seventh, and eighth graders to ninth and twelfth graders. In short, it was a big jump going from a middle school setting to the high school.

How to Teach Students to Identify Bias in a Primary Source

May 30, 2019 By Kevin Gregory

Early in the school year, students often ask me, “why do I need a history class?” They go on to say they know why science, math, and English are taught, but they don't know why they need to learn so many random dates and historical facts. They are skeptical about memorizing facts from the past and its relevance to their future.  I generally respond by saying something along the lines of, “you don’t need to memorize everything,” because a vast amount of information is readily available to today’s students online, but I emphasize that there's more to history and social studies than just dates and figures.

Four Recommendations to Support Struggling and Reluctant Readers in Social Studies

May 16, 2019 By Tina Heafner

Teachers should offer a wide variety of literacy support in their social studies curricula, otherwise students can fall behind. 

Engaging Social Studies Students with Vocabulary Words

May 9, 2019 By Tina Heafner

Vocabulary instruction in social studies is important because it builds background knowledge that is essential when students are assigned to read complex non-fiction texts.  When students have a strong vocabulary, it makes them better readers. 

The Achievement Gap: What It Is and How It Affects Your Students

May 3, 2019 By Pam Gothart

As educators, we always notice gaps and different learning styles among our students, but do we ever think why? Researchers have deemed this “the achievement gap,” which refers to the difference in test scores between different groups of students.

The Importance of Geography — Applications Beyond K-12 Classrooms

April 25, 2019 By Ken Klieman
“The study of geography is about more than just memorizing places on a map.  It’s about understanding the complexity of our world, appreciating the diversity of cultures that exist across continents.  And in the end, it’s about using all that knowledge to help bridge divides and bring people together.” – Barack Obama