Viewing posts in:

Curriculum Instruction

“Pealing” Away Boring Social Studies Lessons with Bells

October 3, 2020 By Kay Gandy

Bells end and begin our classes. In the past, teachers rang hand-held bells to start the school day. The Liberty Bell may be the icon that students know from history, but there are many ways to use bells in the teaching of social studies. Explore with your students how the sound of bells is present in our daily life and in the past.

5 Ways to Make Distance Learning Effective for Students

September 16, 2020 By Leona Henryson

The move to remote learning has thrown students and educators into a whole new world. To help students, educators must understand potential roadblocks and challenges; then they must come up with creative solutions. To help with that, here are five ways to make distance learning effective for students.

Collective Memory: How Do Memories of the Past Inform Our Future?

August 26, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Collective memory, or social memory, is how a group of people remember and forget the past. Individuals and societies base self-understanding and decision-making on past experiences. However, how accurately do we really remember? What do we choose to forget? What is the impact of false or incorrect memories?

How Teachers Can Address Cultural Diversity in the Classroom

August 18, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

As we stand on the precipice of change. We must address several pertinent issues that relate to the Black Lives Matter movement. Change is inevitable, and if things are to be different, a level of respect must be developed between all parties. How do we address these issues? What must we do to ensure students move progressively toward making systemic change?

Books to Promote Diversity in the K-8 Social Studies Classroom

August 13, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Teaching all sides of history and utilizing resources that aim to showcase diverse peoples is essential in the modern social studies classroom. Recognizing the unique struggles of people of color throughout history and empathizing with them takes precedence in learning, now more than ever. 

3 Easy Ways to Make Social Studies Memorable

August 10, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies classrooms can often become a regurgitation of facts, events, and people throughout history. But learning about history and social studies themes has never been more important for students. 

Teaching Remotely: A Reflection for This Upcoming School Year

August 5, 2020 By Jessica Hayes

As I think about my virtual learning experience in the time of quarantine, I will say the feeling that is more dominant than most is “dislike.” I won’t say I hated it, but this was an unusual circumstance into which we were thrown.

Teaching Students About How History Can Repeat Itself

July 27, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

History is the study of past events in human affairs and part of our daily lives. There's no way around it, we are living in a historical moment currently that will affect future generations to come.

Foster Social and Emotional Learning This Upcoming School Year

July 16, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Students in the K-12 setting experience immense developmental changes, socially, emotionally, and academically. All the while, they go through dreaded awkward stages—braces, bad haircuts, first crushes—and experience greater demands from parents, teachers, and community members. 

Building Active Citizenship Skills Through Community Relationships

June 10, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

Participatory citizenship is the act of citizens actively participating through community and political life to build a democracy that respects human rights. Currently, members and allies of the Black Lives Matter movement are partaking in their First Amendment right to protest, aiming to enact change for police reform and civil rights, which offers a unique teaching opportunity to encourage active citizenship. How can we find other ways to help our students understand the importance of becoming an active citizen today?