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History

Black History Month: An Important Addition to American Culture

February 16, 2021 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

The history of America was built by many cultures and ethnic groups. American history encompasses a myriad of cultures, and during the month of February we get the opportunity to celebrate and put a spotlight on Black history and how a race of marginalized people continue to strive against the odds and work toward equality.

President Abraham Lincoln: The Man behind the Legend

February 9, 2021 By Kay Gandy

February is the month that many teachers typically introduce information about the sixteenth president, Abraham Lincoln. From his lessons on money to his famous Gettysburg Address and the Emancipation Proclamation, Lincoln is heralded as a great American hero. The question to consider is “How can one know the man who is so overwhelmingly portrayed by iconography (monuments and memorials)?”

Capitalism, Socialism, Communism: Distinguishing Important Economic Concepts

February 5, 2021 By Cynthia Resor

Capitalism, socialism, and communism are three key concepts in social studies, with complex definitions and complicated histories. Explaining these concepts in the classroom is muddled even more by how these words are used in modern media. The meaning is often obscured by political alliances and deliberate attempts to mislead.

The History behind Presidential Transitions in the United States

January 14, 2021 By Monet Hendricks

American democracy began as an experiment. Historically, nations around the world were empires founded on a hierarchy of monarchs or dictatorship. The founding fathers implemented the US Constitution to ensure that the new nation would be different and represent the interests of all individuals rather than aristocrats—hence the creation of our democratic two-party system of government and the electoral college voting system that elects the presiding members of the executive branch.

4 Considerations to Make This Native American Heritage Month

November 23, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

November is Native American Heritage Month, or, as it is commonly referred to, American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month.

A Brief History of the Right to Vote

October 26, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Determining whether voting is a right or a privilege has been a battleground for states to control who can cast a ballot in elections. Technically, states regulate eligible voters, but, through the course of history, the US federal government has made several key decisions that have altered those requirements in an attempt to create more equality in the voting process.

Why Teaching Social Studies Matters for Our Future

October 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies teachers hold the key to our future.

“Pealing” Away Boring Social Studies Lessons with Bells

October 3, 2020 By Kay Gandy

Bells end and begin our classes. In the past, teachers rang hand-held bells to start the school day. The Liberty Bell may be the icon that students know from history, but there are many ways to use bells in the teaching of social studies. Explore with your students how the sound of bells is present in our daily life and in the past.

Compare and Contrast Nineteenth and Twenty-First Century Media Through “Cut and Paste”

September 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Before the computer revolution, cut and paste required scissors and glue. This method originally required scissors to clip information from a newspaper or magazine and glue so the clipping could be attached to paper and saved, shared, or reprinted. In the twenty-first century, the phrase cut and paste has evolved to describe digital methods of replicating information. As students depend more and more on digital information in the classroom, what are the implications of modern cutting and pasting?

What RBG Means to Me: A Personal Reflection

September 24, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

In early 2019, I walked into an exhibit at the Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles that exponentially expanded my love and respect for Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. I had long admired her soft but fierce demeanor on the Supreme Court bench and was excited to learn more about the life of this extraordinary woman and pop culture icon. I left that museum more awestruck than I could have ever imagined.