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History

Social Reform Throughout History: Lessons for Social Studies Students

September 9, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In our modern world, different groups are seeking to make changes in their society. Protests, violent and nonviolent, come in many forms. The story of England’s seventeenth-century Diggers is a contrast to many historical uprisings because it was peaceful and its participants hoped to reform the economy of their nation and create an agrarian utopia.

Collective Memory: How Do Memories of the Past Inform Our Future?

August 26, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Collective memory, or social memory, is how a group of people remember and forget the past. Individuals and societies base self-understanding and decision-making on past experiences. However, how accurately do we really remember? What do we choose to forget? What is the impact of false or incorrect memories?

3 Easy Ways to Make Social Studies Memorable

August 10, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Social studies classrooms can often become a regurgitation of facts, events, and people throughout history. But learning about history and social studies themes has never been more important for students. 

Teaching Students About How History Can Repeat Itself

July 27, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

History is the study of past events in human affairs and part of our daily lives. There's no way around it, we are living in a historical moment currently that will affect future generations to come.

What Social Studies Students Can Learn from Historical Uprisings

July 8, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In the summer of 1381, working people in England were enraged, and for two months they made their voices heard by forming armed groups, marching on several towns and London, destroying the property of hated government officials, and burning tax records.

Urban Legends Aren’t a New Thing: Teaching Media Literacy with Historical Examples

June 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Urban legends, referred to by folklorists as contemporary legends, are fictional stories claimed to be true. Myths and legends from throughout history often contain an underlying warning about a potential danger to avoid.

A Timeline of African American History in the United States

June 19, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Across the country and the world, people are rallying behind the Black Lives Matter movement to enact change in a system that has historically been unjust to people of color. Our company recognizes the struggles African Americans have faced throughout history and think now is the time to elevate the voices of the unheard.

Black Voices Matter: A Personal Reflection

June 5, 2020 By Daelin Hayes

FEAR. That was the only emotion I felt when I first saw yet another viral video of an African American citizen being senselessly murdered in broad daylight. Fear that when people see me, they don't see someone's son, someone's brother, someone's teammate... they see a threat. I am stripped of my identity and instead reduced down to the color of my skin.

12 Contemporary Novels with Social Studies Themes

May 28, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Contemporary literature gives readers a look at progressive writing styles that often reflect the world in which the works were written. Although often reserved for English or writing courses, recent novels can also be used in secondary social studies classrooms to teach about current events, political themes, economics, sociology, or even history.

Why the History of Words Matters in Social Studies

May 24, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Etymology, the study of the origin of words and how the meanings of words change over time, is just as relevant in social studies as it is in English classes. When words appear in a language, how words evolve and change, and when words are discarded tell a wider social, political, economic, or cultural story. For students learning social studies, the benefits of learning these words can be immense, and serve to build essential skills.