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History

Applying Learned Concepts: Fostering Inquiry in History, Geography, Economics, and Civics

November 7, 2019 By Karla Wienhold

Think back to a moment when you as a student sat in a social studies class and struggled to spit out a memorized date of an important event your teacher said would be integral to remember. Were those moments as dreadful for you as they were for me?

Cemeteries: Primary Sources for Much More Than Famous Dead Guys

October 30, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Cemeteries are trendy destinations. Cemetery tours feature the rich, the famous, the macabre, and ghosts. However, cemeteries can teach students about primary source artifacts and several other important social studies themes.

Teach Students Media Literacy with Historical Sources

October 24, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Internet ads, YouTube videos, social media posts, blogs, emails, and TV infomercials feature questionable and downright dangerous health advice, treatments, and cures. These quacks didn’t just appear in the modern era of broadcast and electronic media. Quacks have been around for centuries, successfully adapting their misleading message to the newest form of media – from word of mouth, to print, to broadcast, to electronic formats.

Symbol Scavenger Hunt: Hands-on Activities for Interpreting Political Cartoons

October 11, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Interpreting political cartoons can be a real challenge for many students in the classroom. Students struggle to recognize the people, symbols, and events without context, making deducing the message of the cartoonist nearly impossible. Create a political cartoon scavenger hunt activity to help your students identify who and what is depicted. With this basic knowledge, interpreting the larger message conveyed by the cartoonist becomes easier.

Using Etiquette Lessons to Discuss Culture and Analyze Primary Sources

September 27, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Etiquette comprises rules to follow and manners expected of a person in social or professional situations. Today, the components of etiquette have been rebranded as “soft skills,” the behaviors that help people work well with others.

Help Your Students Think about Labor Day in a New Way

September 2, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Labor Day commemorates the American worker on the first Monday in September. This upcoming Labor Day, remember to highlight the history of workers who are often overlooked or forgotten: slaves, domestic laborers, military-camp followers, and children.

How to Teach Students to Identify Bias in a Primary Source

May 30, 2019 By Kevin Gregory

Early in the school year, students often ask me, “why do I need a history class?” They go on to say they know why science, math, and English are taught, but they don't know why they need to learn so many random dates and historical facts. They are skeptical about memorizing facts from the past and its relevance to their future.  I generally respond by saying something along the lines of, “you don’t need to memorize everything,” because a vast amount of information is readily available to today’s students online, but I emphasize that there's more to history and social studies than just dates and figures.

Learn Beyond the Page: Teaching Compassion Through Social Studies

April 4, 2019 By Ken Klieman
"If I am not for myself who is for me? And being for my own self, what am 'I'? And if not now, when?" – Hillel the Elder

Long-Lasting Benefits of Teaching Geography and Social Studies Together

March 28, 2019 By Ken Klieman
“History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage need not be lived again.”  - Maya Angelou

Make Your Social Studies Lessons Place-Based with Primary Sources

March 13, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Are you searching for ways to make your social studies lessons relate to the lives of your students? Make memorable connections between national trends in history, economics, culture, politics, and geography with these place-based primary sources.