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Inquiry

Social Reform Throughout History: Lessons for Social Studies Students

September 9, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In our modern world, different groups are seeking to make changes in their society. Protests, violent and nonviolent, come in many forms. The story of England’s seventeenth-century Diggers is a contrast to many historical uprisings because it was peaceful and its participants hoped to reform the economy of their nation and create an agrarian utopia.

What Social Studies Students Can Learn from Historical Uprisings

July 8, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In the summer of 1381, working people in England were enraged, and for two months they made their voices heard by forming armed groups, marching on several towns and London, destroying the property of hated government officials, and burning tax records.

The Teacher's Guide to Helping Students Analyze Political Cartoons

May 18, 2020 By Melissa Knowles

Cartoons can sometimes make a serious point. Benjamin Franklin’s 1754 “Join or Die” began the use of political cartoons. These visuals have been important in history by informing illiterate citizens and conveying a point of view on a political issue.  Cartoonists, with a single picture, could insult enemies, celebrate allies, change people’s minds on important issues, and be humorous enough to make an impact on the public’s view. Political cartoons bring humor and exaggeration to past and current issues. I tell my students political cartoons are pictures with a point.  We can provide students with the tools and questions they can use to decode and understand political cartoons.

A History of Quack Cures: Critical Analysis in the Classroom

May 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Quacks love health crises, and the COVID-19 virus has become very lucrative for people who make claims about unscientific cures. In recent months, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warnings to several companies who are promoting fraudulent products. These companies deceptively claim their products can treat or cure the virus. Modern teas, oils, and other treatments are not scientifically proven to be effective, yet customers are desperate enough to fall for these “curative” products. This isn't to say holistic and alternative medicines do not have healing properties for some, but overall the efficacy of these products and practices is largely unproven by evidence-based research. 

Investigating Personal Primary Sources with Elementary Students

April 16, 2020 By Melissa Knowles

Where do you find elementary school historians? The answer can be right in your digital classroom!

Illustrating Essential Questions Using the TV News

April 9, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Essential questions ask students to consider the “big picture” of a topic. Answering an essential question is not easy, or quick, but these questions encourage students to explore wider and deeper. Information must be gathered, analyzed, and synthesized to construct quality answers.   Therefore, students must also be able to answer the “just the fact” questions.

Teaching Economics with the Essential Question: “What Is It Worth?”

February 13, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

The discipline of economics is often bewildering to students and non-specialists, full of complex theories and challenging charts. Teaching everyday words like market, scarcity, depression, opportunity, and choice becomes much more complicated in the context of economics classes. In addition, the impact of economic theories and policies is not always clear cut; what may benefit some can be harmful to others. Economic policies fall on an ideological spectrum, making classroom discussions of current economic events especially challenging.

How to Teach Students to Take Informed Action in the Classroom

February 3, 2020 By Karla Wienhold

There is a quote by Tony Robbins that resonates with me when teaching: “the path to success is to take massive determined actions.” As an educator, this gives me several things to think about and question during instructional planning.

Opening the Window to the Past: Evaluating Sources and Using Evidence in Social Studies Classrooms

December 5, 2019 By Karla Wienhold

As teachers, we all want a way to make history a fun and engaging subject for our students.  We want them to grasp the historical events that we teach about with the same passion that we have when we are planning the lessons.  As educators, we want them to hear all the amazing stories from the past that will help them understand their role in the world they live in today. 

Applying Learned Concepts: Fostering Inquiry in History, Geography, Economics, and Civics

November 7, 2019 By Karla Wienhold

Think back to a moment when you as a student sat in a social studies class and struggled to spit out a memorized date of an important event your teacher said would be integral to remember. Were those moments as dreadful for you as they were for me?