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History

Help Your Students Think about Labor Day in a New Way

September 2, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Labor Day commemorates the American worker on the first Monday in September. This upcoming Labor Day, remember to highlight the history of workers who are often overlooked or forgotten: slaves, domestic laborers, military-camp followers, and children.

How to Teach Students to Identify Bias in a Primary Source

May 30, 2019 By Kevin Gregory

Early in the school year, students often ask me, “why do I need a history class?” They go on to say they know why science, math, and English are taught, but they don't know why they need to learn so many random dates and historical facts. They are skeptical about memorizing facts from the past and its relevance to their future.  I generally respond by saying something along the lines of, “you don’t need to memorize everything,” because a vast amount of information is readily available to today’s students online, but I emphasize that there's more to history and social studies than just dates and figures.

Learn Beyond the Page: Teaching Compassion Through Social Studies

April 4, 2019 By Ken Klieman
"If I am not for myself who is for me? And being for my own self, what am 'I'? And if not now, when?" – Hillel the Elder

Long-lasting Benefits of Teaching Geography and Social Studies Together

March 28, 2019 By Ken Klieman
“History, despite its wrenching pain cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage need not be lived again.”  - Maya Angelou

Make Your Social Studies Lessons Place-Based with Primary Sources

March 13, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Are you searching for ways to make your social studies lessons relate to the lives of your students? Make memorable connections between national trends in history, economics, culture, politics, and geography with these place-based primary sources.

3 Activities to Celebrate International Women's Day with Your Classroom

February 27, 2019 By Jessica Hayes

International Women’s Day is March 8, 2019, and presents an opportunity to celebrate women from throughout history. Humanities curricula and history books are often dominated by United States presidents, world explorers, and cultural elites, who are mostly male. This year, teach your students about the women activists, suffragettes, and trailblazers who paved the way for equality across the world. Here are some activities to use in the classroom.

How History and Religion Affect Reading Habits and Practices for Latino Students

There can be no doubt that the level of teaching and learning in your classroom would vastly improve if every single student possessed a high literacy level and a consistent reading habit, both at home and school.  However, many do not, and perhaps you’ve wondered why.  In a search for some answers, I would like to pose a few sensitive questions.

Teaching Daily Life in the Past: Using Essential Questions in Chronological Units

January 23, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

The history of ordinary people and everyday life appeals to students. However, teachers struggle to squeeze it into a social studies curriculum dominated by stories of wealthy elites and political chronology. 

Using Displays to Fight the Marginalization of Social Studies

January 3, 2019 By Dixie Massey

A recent conversation with a seven-year-old has given me a lot to think about. I started with the typical questions and eventually worked my way to the topic of school. “What do you think of school?”

3 Novels to Read with Middle School Students in Social Studies

May 30, 2018 By Jessica Hayes

When I first started teaching history, it was difficult for me to incorporate reading passages in a productive and interesting way. I remember looking at a section in my textbook and thinking “how can I keep my students on task when I can barely concentrate on this stuff?”