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History

The Legacy of American First Ladies

February 16, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

From Martha Washington to Michelle Obama, each First Lady has made unique contributions to American history. Learn about the lasting legacies of some of the women behind each United States president.

Teaching Hard History: Is There a Role for Simulations?

February 11, 2020 By Dr. Aaron Willis

Simulations encourage students to “learn by doing.” The goal in using simulations in the classroom is for students to understand a concept or historical experience by acting it out. Creating a kinesthetic experience isn’t quite the same as reading about something in a book.

15+ Women to Celebrate this Black History Month (and Every Month!)

February 6, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

February marks the start of Black History Month, which celebrates the achievements of African Americans in United States history.  From the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement, learn about women who may not always be recognized by history textbooks, but deserve recognition for their contributions in the fight for equality.

 

3 Easy Ways to Make Real-World Connections in Your History Lessons

December 10, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

History is rarely at the top of polls of “favorite subjects in school.” While a magical cure for history aversion has yet to be discovered, the following three tips for connecting the past to the present can make history lessons more relevant to students’ lives.

4 Steps to Integrating a Geographic Lens in World History

November 19, 2019 By Dr. Aaron Willis

Many students have trouble understanding the geographic context of United States history even though they can often relate the themes to their lives. When teachers move to world geography, the problem of relating to the content is compounded many times over. Students rarely have the background knowledge or geographic literacy to understand where things happened in the past. Thus, making the connection between distant places and history to modern society and their own lives can be very difficult.

Globalization Isn’t a New Thing: Teaching the Concept with Historical Examples

November 16, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

While globalization has been a relevant topic for years now, it's not actually a new concept!  Globalization occurred in the ancient, medieval, early modern, and industrial ages. Providing students with a solid understanding of modern globalization in comparison to historical examples makes the past relevant and clarifies current events.

Applying Learned Concepts: Fostering Inquiry in History, Geography, Economics, and Civics

November 7, 2019 By Karla Wienhold

Think back to a moment when you as a student sat in a social studies class and struggled to spit out a memorized date of an important event your teacher said would be integral to remember. Were those moments as dreadful for you as they were for me?

Cemeteries: Primary Sources for Much More Than Famous Dead Guys

October 30, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Cemeteries are trendy destinations. Cemetery tours feature the rich, the famous, the macabre, and ghosts. However, cemeteries can teach students about primary source artifacts and several other important social studies themes.

Teach Students Media Literacy with Historical Sources

October 24, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Internet ads, YouTube videos, social media posts, blogs, emails, and TV infomercials feature questionable and downright dangerous health advice, treatments, and cures. These quacks didn’t just appear in the modern era of broadcast and electronic media. Quacks have been around for centuries, successfully adapting their misleading message to the newest form of media – from word of mouth, to print, to broadcast, to electronic formats.

Symbol Scavenger Hunt: Hands-on Activities for Interpreting Political Cartoons

October 11, 2019 By Cynthia Resor

Interpreting political cartoons can be a real challenge for many students in the classroom. Students struggle to recognize the people, symbols, and events without context, making deducing the message of the cartoonist nearly impossible. Create a political cartoon scavenger hunt activity to help your students identify who and what is depicted. With this basic knowledge, interpreting the larger message conveyed by the cartoonist becomes easier.