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History

Teaching Students About How History Can Repeat Itself

July 27, 2020 By Sheree Turner, Ph.D.

History is the study of past events in human affairs and part of our daily lives. There's no way around it, we are living in a historical moment currently that will affect future generations to come.

What Social Studies Students Can Learn from Historical Uprisings

July 8, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

In the summer of 1381, working people in England were enraged, and for two months they made their voices heard by forming armed groups, marching on several towns and London, destroying the property of hated government officials, and burning tax records.

Urban Legends Aren’t a New Thing: Teaching Media Literacy with Historical Examples

June 29, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Urban legends, referred to by folklorists as contemporary legends, are fictional stories claimed to be true. Myths and legends from throughout history often contain an underlying warning about a potential danger to avoid.

A Timeline of African American History in the United States

June 19, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Across the country and the world, people are rallying behind the Black Lives Matter movement to enact change in a system that has historically been unjust to people of color. Our company recognizes the struggles African Americans have faced throughout history and think now is the time to elevate the voices of the unheard.

Black Voices Matter: A Personal Reflection

June 5, 2020 By Daelin Hayes

FEAR. That was the only emotion I felt when I first saw yet another viral video of an African American citizen being senselessly murdered in broad daylight. Fear that when people see me, they don't see someone's son, someone's brother, someone's teammate... they see a threat. I am stripped of my identity and instead reduced down to the color of my skin.

12 Contemporary Novels with Social Studies Themes

May 28, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

Contemporary literature gives readers a look at progressive writing styles that often reflect the world in which the works were written. Although often reserved for English or writing courses, recent novels can also be used in secondary social studies classrooms to teach about current events, political themes, economics, sociology, or even history.

Why the History of Words Matters in Social Studies

May 24, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Etymology, the study of the origin of words and how the meanings of words change over time, is just as relevant in social studies as it is in English classes. When words appear in a language, how words evolve and change, and when words are discarded tell a wider social, political, economic, or cultural story. For students learning social studies, the benefits of learning these words can be immense, and serve to build essential skills. 

A History of Quack Cures: Critical Analysis in the Classroom

May 7, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

Quacks love health crises, and the COVID-19 virus has become very lucrative for people who make claims about unscientific cures. In recent months, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) issued warnings to several companies who are promoting fraudulent products. These companies deceptively claim their products can treat or cure the virus. Modern teas, oils, and other treatments are not scientifically proven to be effective, yet customers are desperate enough to fall for these “curative” products. This isn't to say holistic and alternative medicines do not have healing properties for some, but overall the efficacy of these products and practices is largely unproven by evidence-based research. 

8 Memoirs That Will Impact Your Social Studies Students

April 23, 2020 By Monet Hendricks

An impactful memoir has long-lasting effects on its reader. For high school students, a real story about the struggles of humanity and strength of the human spirit helps them connect with history and see the world from a different perspective.

Trade Wars Aren’t a New Thing: Examining Economics with Historical Examples

April 21, 2020 By Cynthia Resor

The United States has been involved in trade wars with nations around the world in recent years. Instead of weapons, these “wars” are waged with tariffs, taxes on imported or exported goods.